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Posts tagged ‘jesse wingate’

What is your purpose?

Last week I read a blog post on The New York Times website titled, “A Life Beyond ‘Do What You Love’” by Gordon Marino, professor of philosophy at St. Olaf College. This post got me thinking about the thousands of students who have crossed the stage with a degree in hand over the past few weeks. While this is not typically an aphorism that I use in my daily practice with students and alumni, it does relate well to an ethos commonly shared amongst career development professionals in higher education. The two previous posts that I had written for the EACE Bridges blog were very much focused on the outcomes collection process and the Higher Education Reauthorization, but in reflection about what I had to offer in my final post, I thought it apt to include a bit of my own thoughts about the post graduate experience.

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What is your purpose?

What is your purpose?

EACE Blog contribution by Jesse Wingate, Assistant Director in the Office of Alumni and Career Services, University of Richmond

what-is-your-purpose-quoteLast week I read a blog post on The New York Times website titled, “A Life Beyond ‘Do What You Love’” by Gordon Marino, professor of philosophy at St. Olaf College. This post got me thinking about the thousands of students who have crossed the stage with a degree in hand over the past few weeks. While this is not typically an aphorism that I use in my daily practice with students and alumni, it does relate well to an ethos commonly shared amongst career development professionals in higher education. The two previous posts that I had written for the EACE Bridges blog were very much focused on the outcomes collection process and the Higher Education Reauthorization, but in reflection about what I had to offer in my final post, I thought it apt to include a bit of my own thoughts about the post graduate experience.

The end of an academic year is often a time that yields thought about the finitude of a very common chapter in a person’s life. Staff and faculty offer satisfied sighs of relief; parents and family members dote appropriately on the accomplishments of their graduates; and the graduates themselves say their goodbyes to friends and begin that next chapter of life. As a career professional, it is one of the most satisfying experiences that can be had when a student makes that transition from one identity to the next. As we consider our advice to students as they embark upon this next step, a great question to beg of them is not “what are you going to do?” but instead, “what is your purpose?”

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A Conversation Starter: Reflections on Outcomes Reporting and the Higher Education Act

A Conversation Starter: Reflections on Outcomes Reporting and the Higher Education Act 

EACE Blog contribution by Jesse Wingate, Assistant Director in the Office of Alumni and Career Services, University of Richmond

The pending adjustments to the Higher Education Act will impact the way in which the consumer of higher education makes decisions about which college or university to attend. That is something of interest to us all, professionals in the career development and recruiting fields.

Over the past five years, there has been considerable attention given to the systemic burden of rising tuition costs, which has promoted an abysmal conversation about the return-on-investment of (ROI) of higher education. In reality, we know that an undergraduate degree continues to favor those in the workforce. But, we also know that student debt has surpassed the $1 trillion mark, that recent graduates average borrowing amounts of about $30,000, and in the past 30 years the average tuition at public four-year colleges and universities has increased by more than 250%, far exceeding the rate of inflation.

Abysmal indeed. Since the last reauthorization of the Act in 2008, legislators have been raising the bar and holding colleges more accountable for the information that they disseminate to prospective students regarding costs. As an accountability measure, colleges and universities are obligated to collect post graduate outcome information Read more

Strategic Partnerships for Increasing Knowledge Rates in First Destination Surveys

Strategic Partnerships for Increasing Knowledge Rates in First Destination Surveys

EACE Blog contribution by Jesse Wingate, Assistant Director in the Office of Alumni and Career Services, University of Richmond

As defined by the NACE Standards and Protocols for the Collection and Dissemination of Graduating Students Initial Career Outcomes Information for Undergraduates

On Friday, January 31st I attended the first NACE Advocacy Mash Up  in Washington, D.C. Career development professionals from around the country filled a 140-seat auditorium to learn a bit more about the new standards and protocols for the collection and reporting of post graduate student outcomes for undergraduate institutions. Designed by the NACE First-Destination Survey Task force, with the input of NACE members, standards were shared to assist colleges and career development offices in their collection processes of post graduation outcomes.

In review of these standards, institutions are encouraged to collect the “highest possible rate” (a preferential minimum of 65%) alluding to the “knowledge rate” that an institution Read more

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