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Posts from the ‘Tech Bytes’ Category

Flipping the Classroom: Taking a Career Development Seminar Online

By Lauren E. Creamer, M.S., Co-op & Career Advisor, Wentworth Institute of Technology

Co-ops and internships are integral to the success of students post-graduation; and the offices that support those programs must find effective ways to prepare them for these experiences. Our office, The Center for Cooperative Education and Career Development at Wentworth Institute of Technology supports nearly 900 students per year in their search for co-op, a graduation requirement for all majors. Advisors were spending countless appointment explaining the same concepts time and again. In the fall of 2014, in an effort to meet the needs of the students, Co-op Institute was born.

What is Co-op Institute? co-op_institute_logo_rgb

Co-op Institute originated as a five-week, lecture-style seminar with a goal to disseminate information to as many students as possible in one place. Topics include resume and cover letter writing, networking, job searching, interviewing, and professionalism. Each semester material cuts were made to insure the class could run in the time allotted. And each semester we found ourselves saying “… but I want to teach more.”

In the summer of 2016 we decided it was time to flip the classroom. I led our advisor team in the development of this program, taking our existing lecture materials and turning them into short, narrated videos. This opened the instructors up to interact with the students in a more personal way, giving them the ability to facilitate activities and provide one-on-one feedback during peer-editing sessions.

The process was long, and not-too-painful, but it did involve vetting a number of different video platforms and much back and forth with our technology division.

Options We Considered

The only way I had made videos in the past was via iMovie and for a few weeks I was convinced that I needed a Mac to make any kind of video. Not so. iMovie is a great option and comes standard on Macs, but if you don’t have one don’t sweat it. Windows has comparable software.

We also considered Echo360, a screen capture tool, and a strong contender. The tool allowed users to flag material they had trouble understanding and allowed for built-in quizzes. It would have been great for the end user, but the set-up was complex and required more work than the advisors had time to offer.

Our Platform

As we utilize Blackboard to share our course materials, it was important that we use something compatible. We ended up choosing Kaltura CaptureSpace, a software that was already connected to our Blackboard system.

Kaltura is easy to use for screen capture and allows the user to add in questions (multiple choice) throughout the video. The downside is that you can’t flag areas of confusion and there is no option to stall the video if the user doesn’t get the questions right. All things considered, a perfect fit for our first run through. (And the Institute already paid for it).

recordscreen

Other Free or Low-Cost Options

For the budget-conscious team, consider using Facebook Live or YouTube to develop and upload content. The Haitt Career Center at Brandeis has been using Facebook Live for the past several months and it’s pretty cool. Lots of schools are using YouTube to upload original content (of course, this still means you need to have a webcam and a means of recording it).

There is a chance your school already pays for tutorial videos such as Lynda.com or Atomic Learning. If that’s the case, this could be a great idea if you don’t have the time to develop your own content. There are some quality career development videos on each.

If you’re not up for video, but your institution has a radio station and open air time, consider hosting a show. Our office also produces WITworks Radio – tune in Mondays at 1:00 PM!

Feedback from Students

We’re still sifting through the student feedback at this time (we finished up about one month ago), but a major trend seems to be that students really love the interactive nature of the class-time. Whether they love the videos as they are now remains to be seen. There is always room for improvement!

Bio:  Lauren is a Senior Co-op + Career Advisor at Wentworth Institute of Technology in Boston. She works with biomedical and electromechanical engineering, and applied mathematics majors. She has worked in higher education for five years in both career development and residential life. Lauren is responsible for executing and assessing Co-op Institute, a seven-week preparatory seminar focusing on applying to and interviewing for co-ops. This past year she led the advisor team at Wentworth in flipping the classroom for Co-op Institute, to allow for a more in-depth learning experience.

Evolution of Technology: With Greater Connectivity Are We Less Connected?

EACE Blog contribution by Anne Marie Gercke, Associate Director of Career Services at University of Pennsylvania

In the year 2000, hip phones were flip phones, dial-up was still a thing and visiting Blockbuster could easily be part of the Friday night agenda. Today, 15 years later, smart phones may as well grow from our limbs, information is at our fingertips (literally) and movies can be streamed at any given time from personal devices we keep in our pockets. In fact, we don’t just use technology these days, we also wear it! It’s a brave new technologically-run world and at times it’s hard to keep up. Read more

TECH Corner – 5 Instagram Tools To Check Out

EACE Blog contribution by Megan Wolleben, Assistant Director, Bucknell University’s Career Development Center

5 Instagram Tools To Check Out

This post is a fine example of the benefits of EACE and the great relationships formed within this organization. A fellow member, Demetria, and I have worked closely together for the last two years with her role on the EACE Bridges Blog committee and mine on the Tech Committee bringing us in frequent contact. Last month Demetria sent a long a few articles she found on topics she liked and wanted to know more about and suggested perhaps other EACE members would as well. She suggested a blog post and so here I am at your (and Demetria’s) service.  Based on the article that appeared in Ragan’s PR Daily, I am going to talk about 5 of the “13 Instagram tools brands should be using” in today’s post.

I think the second biggest gripe I have with Instagram (the first being no toggle between accounts!) is the desire to schedule posts. I know it’s counter-intuitive to the “insta” part of Instagram but – let’s face it – it’s nice to be able to plan out some posts once in a while or not have your account go dark if you are on vacation.  Here are two tools you can use for scheduling:

  1. ScheduGram: lets you upload and schedule images across multiple Instagram accounts with the added bonus of being able to do it from a desktop. ScheduGram not only offers the ability to manage multiple accounts, it also allows for multiple users and bulk uploads.  Another bonus: ScheduGram offers direct integration with Canva for designing images. The only downside is that it is not our favorite price: free BUT it is very reasonably priced starting at just $5 per week.
  2. Take Off : gives you scheduling capabilities for FREE but is mobile-only and lacks some of the features of ScheduGram. The answer to our need of scheduling is there though and with that the platform also offers help in finding the best time to schedule your posts and suggests  times when they’ll be seen by most of your followers. In addition there is an interesting feature that works to optimize your captions by analyzing your caption and then suggesting “relevant, high discovery hashtags.” Take Off also allows for multiple team members.

The third thing on my list for Instagram may be your number one and that is a way to get stats.

  1. Iconosquare: I am going to start with Iconsquare because it’s most familiar to me after I covered it on our April 2nd Tech Tools Webinar. As I stated in the webinar the features I love about Iconsquare are: rolling month metrics; scores for your love rate, talk rate, spread rate; engagement stats that allow you to see which posts were most liked and had the most comments, and I could go on. Suffice it to say that I like Iconosquare and think you might too.
  2. INK361: Another tool that offers a similar array of features as Iconsquare is INK361. This tool provides stats and the neat ability to add a circle of users and only see their posts (think Google+). You can also print from this tool and comment with emojis (HUGE!). The only negative thing I noticed were more ads on this site than Iconosquare but that can easily be overlooked.

For sharing it’s good old Repost coming in at #5. Repost  is a popular app to use to share other user’s photos or videos while easily giving credit to the original poster. It is good to use if you are or will be doing this often while on mobile. If you mainly repost from desk and want to limit the amount of apps you have, you can also use iconsquare. Either way, having a tool to easily share users photos or videos that you may be tagged in or that pertain to your profile is a must.

A bonus from this article for me was learning about Instagram for Business – I really like the inspiration and resources available here.

I learned about a lot of great tools to use with Instagram from this article so check out all 13 of them.

 

Megan Wolleben

Megan Wolleben

Megan Wolleben has worked at the Bucknell University Career Development Center since 2007, where she is currently an Assistant Director. She is responsible for the marketing and communications of the office, as well as manages the department’s social media presence. She is the co-chair for EACE’s Technology Committee and a contributing writer to the National Association of Colleges & Employers (NACE) “Tech Talk” column as well as co-author of the “Career Counselor’s Guide to Social Media”. Megan earned her B.A. and Master’s in Communication from Fordham University.

Tech Corner: 3 Apps I Can’t Live Without

EACE Blog contribution by Rachel Wobrak, Program Director, University of Maryland’s University Career Center & The President’s Promise

For the purposes of this blog post, these are three apps that help my productivity and keep me organized. Obviously, there are a ton of apps and websites I could mention here, but these three I use every day; well two I use every day and a new one I just discovered that I think will quickly fit that description. A big reason I like all three of these is because they can easily be used across multiple devices. All have web versions and app versions for your phone. I find they’re all a great way to keep organized across multiple devices when at work, home or on the go. You can share things from your home or work computer with your phone or ipad, vice versa or any combination. Another big plus…all have free versions that get a lot done. Some of these may not be new to you, but I will briefly sing their praises here.

 

Workflowy

credit: workflowy.com

credit: workflowy.com

If you’re like me and love a good to-do list, this is an app to pay attention to. It works in an outline format, very simple. You won’t get pretty graphics or colors. It is, quite simply, a white screen with black type, but it’s great for managing home and work projects. You can easily collapse topics or zoom in to see only what you want to see at any given time. You can have separate categories for work and home and as many subcategories and levels of indentation and bullet points under each that you’d like. They’ve got a really great tutorial video.

 

It’s really helpful when managing tasks or ideas. I’ve already started brainstorming programs I want to put together over the next academic year and have bullets underneath each for people I need to talk to, tasks to complete, and things to think about over the summer as I begin planning these programs.

 

Dropbox

I’ve used Dropbox for a number of years now. I know there are a ton of different things you can do with it and I’m probably a more basic user, but still feel I use it a lot. It’s an app to store and share

credit:dropbox.com

credit:dropbox.com

files, pictures, etc. It’s great to be able to access certain files at home, work and on my phone. I also put my most important documents there as a backup cloud storage. You get 2GB for free and by referring people you can earn more free space. You can also always pay for more space. I really like that I can have pictures I take on my phone automatically back up to my Dropbox account until I have the time to back them up on my home computer or external hard drive.

Dropbox is great for sharing files and contributing to work with another person. You can create a folder and share only its contents or simply share one document. It’s also great if I start a project on one computer and plan to finish it up or need to send it from another computer. For example an EACE blog post I might have started on my personal laptop but put finishing touches and submitted from my work computer.

 

Pocket

credit:Pocket.com

credit:Pocket.com

This is quickly becoming my new favorite app. When answering email or scrolling through Facebook or Twitter on my phone, I often find myself opening a new window in my phone’s browser when I find an article or website that I want to read. Sometimes I don’t have time to read it in that moment and don’t want to forget to come back to it. This turns into a long, long list of tabs on my phone’s browser or an email to myself with a link to open later. Pocket is my new answer. I can move them out of my browser, store them in one place (accessible by any of my devices) and tag them to make the list easier to sift through. There is an extension to create a button right on your browser on your computer or you can download the app to your phone and allow your phone’s browser to integrate and save directly to Pocket instead of opening too many tabs. I only just put it on my computer and phone yesterday and already I’ve found I’m using it a ton. I’m a big Pinterest user for articles, ideas or pictures I want to keep and store in specific boards for a longer period of time, but I find this is the perfect answer to articles I want to keep temporarily to easily find again later when I have a moment.

 

I’d love to hear what apps or websites work for you or if you have a different way you use these same apps. Please list them in the comments below or feel free to reach out to me on twitter. I love to learn about a good tool/resource.

 

Idea for this blog borrowed from: http://www.prdaily.com/Main/Articles/18507.aspx


 

 

Rachel Wobrak

Rachel Wobrak

Rachel Wobrak has been a Program Director at the University Career Center & The President’s Promise since 2010. She works with the College of Computer, Mathematical & Natural Sciences. She assists with the office’s social media presence by managing the Center’s Pinterest account. She’s a member of the EACE Technology Committee. Rachel has her MEd from the University of Florida in Student Personnel in Higher Education and her BA from the University of Maryland in Classics (proof you can find a great career with any major). Please feel free to connect with her on Twitter or LinkedIn.

 

Tech Corner: Twitter Chat – Students reneging job offers?

Students reneging job offers?!

Join the conversation.

Megan Wolleben from Bucknell Career Development Center and Vanguard invite you to join the discussion of this timely topic.

Where? on the EACE Twitter Chat

When: at 12:00 today (April 14)

How?

What is a Twitter Chat?
A group of people who all tweet about the same topic at a designated time using a specific tag (#) called a hashtag that allows it to be followed on Twitter. Think of it as a virtual facilitated round-table discussion on Twitter.

Want to just follow the conversation?

Look for #EACE on Twitter or go to Tweetchat.com and type in #EACE. New to Twitter?

Check out this EACE Twitter Guide and the recording of EACE’s Twitter 101 webinar.

We hope you will join the 4/14 chat!

Tech Corner: “Hangout with Us”Google+ Hangouts & Live Stream OnAir

EACE Blog contribution by Mary Alice Barrows, Assistant Director at William Paterson University of New Jersey

Google Hangouts have become a popular resource for both personal and professional use in 2015. We have seen an array of programs ranging from admissions Q&A sessions to employer/alumni panels. As an avid user of Google Hangouts, I wanted to explore practical uses for this platform in our career service offices. Read more

Tech Corner: Twitter Chat Poll

It’s that time of year when our committees look back and reflect on all that we’ve done before we meet up at the Conference (hope you are all coming to Pittsburgh!) . In doing so we’d like to hear from our EACE members to evaluate the benefit of offering Twitter Chats and continuing with as a committee moving forward. We see a lot of interest in the beginning of the school year but then participation starts to dwindle. Our EACE chats are held on the 2nd Tuesday of every month (next one is 4/14 with me and Vanguard on students reneging job offers!). Our topics have included: Setting up student workers for success, Hiring Veterans, Find professional development opportunities at your organization, Salary Negotiations, Working with international students.
Please give us honest feedback and let us know what you love about Twitter Chats or what has stopped you from joining.

EACE committees are here to serve the members and we want to make sure we are doing that to the best of our ability. Thank you for taking the time to take this poll and we hope you will join us for our 4/14 chat with Vanguard on reneging offers.

How Can I Help You?

EACE Blog contribution by Megan Wolleben, Assistant Director, Bucknell University’s Career Development Center

I am a huge Beatle’s fan but even if you aren’t it is easy to agree that we all “get by with a little help from our friends.” Professionally much of what I have learned has been through talking, sharing, and asking for help from people in my network. So for this blog post I want to take a moment to ask what do you need help with? What do you wish you knew how to do? What skill do you feel you can improve? Read more

Tech Corner: Always looking for Ideas to Promote Career Center Events to Students…..

EACE Blog contribution by Carolyn Sutphin, Employer Relations & Events Coordinator at Radford University

Trying to think of ways to promote your next career fair or on campus recruitment? How do you get students to participate? Here a few ideas to get the word out:

-Create a video of what the student should expect at your next career fair. Share with the student the floor plan, the agenda for the day.. How to prepare for the fair, and how to network with the recruiters. Host your video on Vimeo and YouTube. Upload to your Center’s Facebook page and the Center’s website.

-Have a workshop 3-4 days prior to the event. Let the students know what to expect and how to prepare for the event.

-Give away door prizes. Students and employers both love free stuff. Start with a blog post to describe the door prize(s) and then how to participate. In the post invite students to participate in one of two ways—first through a tweet contest or second through Instagram. It gets students involved and builds student’s interest in your event.

-Use Pinterest to post pictures from previous events. Upload infographics to your board to prepare the students for the event.

-Ask other departments on campus to promote your event on their accounts such as Facebook and Twitter.

-Advertise on monitors around campus. Students like visual more so than having to read a lot of text.

-Have an information table in your student center and promote your events at that time. At your table have flyers and freebies for the student to take away with them. Free food always brings students to the table.

-Post your event on your Center’s social media sites such as Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and Pinterest.

We’re always looking for ideas and suggestions. Please feel free to share your comments and suggestions on how to get student’s attending events and taking advantage of on campus recruiting.


 

Carolyn-SutphinCarolyn Sutphin has worked at Radford University for 34 years and obtained her Bachelors and Master’s degree while working full-time on campus.  In 2005 she began working in the  Career Center as the Database Manager/Web Developer and several years later became the Employer Relations and Events Coordinator for the department.  She received her Master of Science in Educational Technology from Radford University.  She is a member of the EACE Technology Committee.  Please feel free to connect with her on LinkedIn or Twitter.

 

A Technophiles Favorite [Career] Books

EACE Blog contribution by Megan Wolleben, Assistant Director, Bucknell University’s Career Development Center

I know you mainly hear me harp on about social media and all things digital but today I’m going to kick it old school and talk about BOOKS. In 2014 I set a goal to read 52 books; by December 9th I had read 53 effectively reaching (and surpassing!) my goal. I prefer to read non-fiction so many of the books I read end up being career and work related.

Read more

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