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EACE Call for Proposals Tip Sheet

The EACE Programming Committee is now accepting proposals to present at the 2017 Annual Conference. We are looking for proposals to cover a wide variety of topics including, but not limited to:

  • Assessment & Strategic Planning (best practices, new approaches to program assessment, learning outcomes, graduate outcomes)
  • Career Community Models
  • Career Coaching & Counseling (colleges: counseling students and their parents, employers: recruiting students and their parents)
  • Diversity & Global Issues
  • Marketing & Technology
  • Employer Relations & Recruiting (best practices for HR recruiters)
  • University Partnerships (faculty/academic & alumni affairs/development partnerships with career centers)

Tips for Submitting Your Proposal

  1.  GIVE IT TIME – A good proposal takes time to create! Set aside a few hours to review past proposals, draft out your presentation outline, and craft your title and session description.
  2. TAILOR YOUR SESSION – Increase your chances of being selected by aligning with one of our topics above and think about a format that involves the audience and stimulates discussions (instead of straight lecture).
  3. MAKE IT CATCHY – The title and description you create now will be listed in the app and booklet, so consider the audience, topic area and relevance to your presentation. Use action verbs and results-oriented words. Your title must be both attention-grabbing and give a good description of your session.
  4. GET CREDIT – Sessions that are NBCC or HRCI accredited have an increased likelihood of being selected for the conference, and tend to have higher attendance. Review the guidelines for HRCI (Human Resources Certification Institute) and NBCC (National Board for Certified Counselors).
  5. SHARE TAKEAWAYS – Think about the learning outcomes. What information will attendees learn? What new insights will you cultivate? What best practices or how-to’s will you share? Answer the following: “By attending this session, attendees will gain…”

CLICK HERE to download the EACE Call For Proposals Tip Sheet and view sample proposals.

 Additional Information 

  • Back by popular demand, EACE is offering ONE FREE conference registration per accepted break-out session. The free conference registration will be given to the lead presenter listed on this form and is non-transferable. This offer is not applicable to speed learning presenters. You MUST register by the early bird deadline (March 31, 2017) to take advantage of the complimentary registration.
  • Presentations are expected to stick closely to what is proposed on this form.
  • Presenters will not be compensated.
  • EACE provides presenters of break-out sessions with a projector and screen, but you should bring your own laptop and adaptor.


Who can submit a proposal?
Anyone who has a relevant topic to share! We’ve had submissions from graduate assistants, faculty, career counselors, VPs, directors, recruiters and more.

Where is the Annual Conference?
Jun. 21-23, 2017
Sheraton at the Falls
300 Third St.
Niagara Falls, NY 14303

How long should my presentation be?
Break-out sessions are 60 minutes, speed-learning sessions are 20 minutes.

When are proposals due?
The deadline for submitting a proposal is Nov. 1, 2016.

When will I know if my proposal was accepted?
You will be notified by February 2017 on the status of your proposal and if it was accepted as a break-out session or will be offered as a speed-learning session.

Who should I contact with additional questions?
2017 EACE Annual Conference Programming Co-Chairs:
Katie Scheuer –
Ali Woodworth – alison.woodworth@bc.edueace-call-for-proposals-tip-sheet_page_2


5 Ways to Market “Road Trips to the Real World” on YOUR Campus!

rtrwbanner2017EACE’s Road Trips to the Real World offers your students the opportunity to attend employer site visits for ONE DAY between January 4 – 13, 2017. Host companies will talk about their organization, industry, internships, and job opportunities This is a chance for your students to get the inside scoop and literally get their foot in the door at 40 participating employers across the northeast…BUT space is limited and spots fill up VERY quickly, so encourage students to register now! Registration opens today, October 17th, and closes on December 9th. Students can register at:

Here are 5 ways you can spread the word about Road Trips on your campus:

  1. Social Media: Check out our Career Center Marketing Toolkit which has sample tweets and Facebook posts ready to go. Follow the suggested timeline, copy and paste, and boom – your students will catch wind of the great sites participating this year. Attach our infographic for a nice visual.
  2. Campus Announcements: Use your school’s campus wide announcement system to post a message about Road Trips. We’ve drafted up a sample campus announcement template which along with our infographic or flyer will catch their eye.
  3. Targeted Emails: Send targeted emails out to various student groups (specific majors, professional clubs, faculty and academic departments, special student leader groups like RA’s, OL’s, student workers, athletes and coaches, etc.) Use our Student Email template and tweak accordingly.
  4. Career Management System Messages: Whether you have CSO, Handshake, or Simplicity chances are you can send mass emails out to students. Use our campus announcement template and send it out using your Career Management System.
  5. Good Old Word of Mouth: Talk to students during your one-on-one appointments, at events, over the phone, or during a workshop. When you have their undivided attention, they’ll be more likely to hear all the great benefits of participating in Road Trips!

If you’d like more help in marketing the Road Trips program on your campus, please contact Committee Co-Chairs Katie Vagen at and Kelly Bellew at This program would not be successful without the help of our amazing EACE college and university members!


It’s that time again. Career Fair season is here. Many career offices have been or will be hosting their annual Career and Internships Fairs this fall. Wouldn’t be great to win a prize for all your hard work and planning?

sharefairThe EACE PR Committee is excited to be hosting our Share your Fair Contest, which will allow you to show off your hard work and career center pride with #EACE. The contest will run through November 1st.

To participate just snap and post pictures of your fall career fairs! Creativity counts.  The most creative posts that use #EACE will win a Starbucks gift card for their office!

Enter to win prize for your entire office. Here are this year’s prizes.

  • 1st place: $100 gift card
  • 2nd place: $25 gift card
  • 3rd place: $25 gift card

Not sure where to start? Get your students and employers involved. Snap some pictures showcasing your talented students interacting with your employer partners.  Photos must be uploaded to an individual or career center Twitter and/or Instagram account to enter the contest, and the body of the post or tweet must include #EACE & #SHAREYOURFAIR. Photos can also be edited to include #EACE somewhere on the image.

Winners will be announced during the week of Nov. 7 and featured in the EACE Digest E-Blast!

Promoting Your Career Center

By Jo-Ann Raines, Director, NJIT Career Development Services, Student/Alumni Career Development

Career Services staff on college campuses often lament that students are often clueless of the availability of career advisement and ancillary services and programs.  How many of us have heard, “I didn’t know you people were here!” or something similar, a couple of months before graduation.  Even with consistent marketing and outreach in various forms, engaging students can be a challenge.

Career Development Services at New Jersey Institute of Technology (NJIT) recently offered a new event for us, tied to the opening of our new office in a main campus building last December.  In the spring, we decided to hold an open house to show off the new digs and give students an opportunity to find us in our new spot or to find us for the first time.  As the planning progressed, we decided to include faculty and staff as part of the target audience and invited our advisory board members to take part.  This was not going to be a cookies-and-punch event with a ribbon cutting.  Instead it evolved into showcase of what we had to offer our multiple constituent groups.

Held on a Friday around common hour for 2 ½ hours, we utilized every available space in and around the office.  Registration was held in the outside hallway, where we also had a photo booth set up for photos with the Highlander, our school mascot.  As students entered, they were given a passport and offered a selection of activities using our interview rooms, civic engagement center, and work study student area.  For each activity they attended, they got a sticker for the passport which they could submit for a raffle for a raffle (gift card to the NJIT bookstore) as they were leaving. They had a choice of 5-10 minute presentations by staff on Big Interview, LinkedIn, and Creating a Strong Resume. Corporate partners gave 5 to 10 minute briefings in shifts on their companies and answered students’ questions.  In our Civic Engagement Center, students were invited to enter their employment information into our database, allowing us to gather information on internships and part time jobs we may not otherwise have obtained. They were also encouraged to sign up for volunteer activities for the semester. And of course, there was food.  We set up three food and beverage stations throughout the office that quickly ran out (if you feed them, they will come!).

In an adjacent conference room, two corporate advisory board members hosted separate panels on A Whole New World: Navigating the Workplace as a Young Professional.  In our Career Resource Center, three staff members interacted with faculty and university staff on services to students, employer engagement, and community service and how faculty could become more involved with our office.  Staff wore our uniform red shirts and name tags, and our work study students who acted as guides wore their black counterpart shirts.  After the guests had departed, we hosted the advisory board members with lunch in the executive director’s office.  They had earned it!

Needless to say, it was a jam-packed 2 ½ hours, literally and figuratively.  We registered over 300 students in attendance but missed many because of the crowd. This was a very collaborative event, greatly enhanced by the participation of our advisory board members.  You may want to consider hosting this event on a smaller or larger scale, if you haven’t had a similar one in the recent past.

Cranky Director’s Corner – Welcome Back Edition

Hello Gentlereaders. Welcome to the Cranky Director’s Corner. The CDC will offer periodic installments of grousing and grumping about the things that affect our profession. You know, those topics bouncing around the back of your mind, but you might not say aloud.

Read more

Double Dog Dare

By Megan Wolleben, Assistant Director at Bucknell University and EACE Board Member. 

I know we are all in the middle crazy times for our members – from putting on career fairs (remember the #ShareYourFair social media campaign!) on the college side to going to them week after week recruiting on our employer side – and the last thing you want to do right now is to say yes to something else. But that’s exactly what I’m going to ask you to do. Do you remember how we wrapped up the EACE conference in June? With the amazingly energizing Lu Ann Cahn!  That energy has stayed with me and now I want to know if you’ve done what you dared yourself to do that day?


First dare in the books and 1st in my age group!

At our table I shared my dare: complete a Sprint Triathlon. My brother-in-law had been bugging me to do one with him but the timing and the location was not working out. Saying no had left me with a nagging feeling that I was avoiding a challenge. So when I saw that I would be home for one in my own town I thought how could I say no? But I still hadn’t committed to it. Sharing my dare aloud made it real and after the conference I registered. That was actually the hardest part – well actually the run was pretty bad that day because of real feel temps pushing over 100! – but seriously taking the step to commit myself to this dare was the first challenge to overcome. I knew I could do it but I don’t like to “just do” things. I like to do them and do them well. I – like many millennials (and people) – get paralyzed by the fear of failure. But by daring myself I took off some of that pressure; my first step would now be trying it out. You can’t be bad at something you never try, right? (Try? Tri? The double entendres are endless.) It was freeing. I also had the pressure of returning to the EACE conference next year (Niagara Falls, who’s comin’?!) without having done my dare. No way that was happening.


Second dare – and 102 miles – in the books!

And then a funny thing happened – before I even crossed the finish line for the Tri I had already found my next dare: biking 100 miles! This one I was so proud of and, if you let me, I could go on and on about it. But I know you are busy so let me just wrap it up and say Lu Ann was right!  One dare begets another; an inch out of your comfort zone once gives you confidence to go a mile out of it next time. I know my dares were more physically challenging than professional but the mindset – of saying yes before you say no, of not holding yourself back, of finally trying things you’ve said for years you wanted to do – all that can easily transfer over to work. Maybe it’s a new big idea you’ve been scared to bring up, maybe it’s a course you want to take, maybe it’s saying no to something that just isn’t working any more. The possibilities – the dares to try – are endless. 

Given that Lu Ann originally dared you consider this a double dog dare. Yeah, I am serious! Do your dare, share your dare, do another dare!

I know I’m not the only one out there, have you completed your dare? Share it with us by sending in details to the PR team. Want to write a post about it? Do that too by using this form. We can’t wait to hear from you, share your dare and celebrate your accomplishment!


Creating a Career Services/Classroom Partnership

By Jo-Ann Raines, Director, Career Development Services, NJ Institute of Technology

Another academic year is upon us.  One of the challenges often facing career services offices is building strong relationships with academic departments.  A strong relationship can help students to become aware of Career Services and career planning.  At NJIT we have formed an alliance with the College of Computing Sciences (CCS) that has been mutually beneficial for all.

In the fall of 2011, the undergraduate academic advisor in CCS expressed her concern that her second year students were not as strong as they could be in self-marketing skills and general business savvy.  She proposed a mandatory internship prep course for one credit that would include input from and interaction with Career Services.  Held in the spring of 2012, the first group of 90 students in three course sections attended Career Services workshops that focused on resume writing, interviewing skills, and career fair preparation.  Career Services staff visited each of the sections and critiqued each student’s resume.  Participants were also directed to online tutorials for interviewing. Mandatory attendance at the spring career fair was an additional requirement for the course.

Since 2011, the College of Computing Sciences and Career Services have worked closely to continue to grow this program.  The second-year course has grown to include internship and co-op preparation as well as mandatory attendance at Career Services’ programming such as the Sophomore Success Workshop Series.  As a final requirement, the students wrote reflection papers on their experience in the course and what they learned.

The program has also expanded to a mandatory senior level one-credit career development course.   As part of this course, students are required to participate in Career Services’ events such as Practice Interviews with Employers, Career Fair Preparation Workshops, and the Senior Workshop Series.  Career advisors facilitate some of the in-person class meetings and students are encouraged to meet with their career advisor.

CCS now has a means of exposing its students to career preparation that is tied to their course work and makes them better candidates for internships as well as full time positions.  Career Services has a cadre of students who are now aware of our services and programs through firsthand experience and also augmented its pool of students for computer-related co-op positions.  The students have grown in confidence in their ability to compete for positions they desire. Students now have a better idea of how the classroom and experiential learning interact.  The university’s reward is a new retention tool for second year students who are at risk of leaving but now have an incentive to remain.  Students understand the connection between classroom and career, and are motivated to succeed in co-op, internship, and full-time positions.

Honoring the Past, Treasuring the Present

Honoring the Past, Treasuring the Present by EACE Conference 2016 Grant Recipient, Melissa Burgess

Thank you, EACE Grants Committee, for allowing me the opportunity to honor my past and treasure my present. The 2016 conference was uniquely special to me: just over a year ago, I left Philadelphia to return to my home state of New York and left behind a wonderfully supportive, compassionate, and intelligent network of colleagues. Returning to EACE this year, for me, felt like a homecoming. I was able to catch up with old friends and shake hands with new ones, and through conversation I found myself brimming with renewed passion for my work.

While grabbing a bite for lunch before the kick-off keynote, a gentleman approached my table to ask if guests seat themselves or if he needed to wait to be seated. A few minutes later, he asked if the restaurant provides a menu or if he needed to order at the counter. Sensing nerves and noticing a familiar blue and orange lanyard, I challenged my comfort zone (which prefers eating alone with a book to read) and did something we teach our students: I networked. I asked if he wanted to join me and he did. It was a small win for my introverted psyche.

In preparation for the conference, I had glanced through the workshop descriptions and marked down the seminars I planned on attending. It wasn’t even a question whether or not I would attend the opening keynote; I always did. So I skimmed the bios without paying a lot of attention. I’m glad I skimmed! I was eating lunch with Dr. Rob Bell, EACE’s opening keynote speaker! #celebritymoment

We chatted about EACE: what are some of the challenges we face? What are some of the things we most look forward to while attending our annual conference? The parade in Cleveland celebrating the Cavs’ first title win ever was playing on the cafe television and we talked about Lebron James and his crazy amazing career. We touched on the mental preparation required to achieve goals, collective goals like winning the first title for your sports team and individual goals like landing your first-choice internship. It was a down-to-earth conversation about real things, an easy connection to make and remember. In other words, it was networking at it best (and least scary!).

Upon returning to Cornell University, my new home, I am excited to offer creative thoughts on our future programming, share knowledge that I learned through workshops and keynotes, and bring personal anecdotes to my conversations with students. Thank you, EACE, for providing a space that encourages our past to mingle with our present and in doing so, empowers us to transfer knowledge, participate in brainstorming sessions, and accomplish personal growth milestones. #EACE16


Melissa Burgess is currently Assistant Director of Career Services for Industrial and Labor Relations students at Cornell University. Melissa’s background includes working for a community college in southern Maine, creating innovative career development programs at Cabrini College (now University!), and volunteering to teach kiddos in southern Peru. She earned a Bachelor’s in Communication and Psychology from the University at Buffalo and a Master’s in Higher Education from the University of Pennsylvania.

PD Grant Plug: EACE is now accepting applications for the Professional Development Grant as well as the Diversity & Inclusion Scholarships.


Reflections of a New Attendee

By: Jenny Roxas |  LinkedIn  |  Twitter  |  

“You are where you are because of the decisions you’ve made. The choice has always been yours to make. Either choose to be great or choose to be waste.” – Rocky Balboa


I think it’s appropriate to use a Rocky quote since our conference was in Philly.

I would like to first give a shout out to the Diversity and Inclusion Committee for awarding me the Rick McLellan Scholarship that allowed me the ability to attend the EACE Conference. Just to give some background, I’m originally from California. I moved last year to the East Coast for my current position as a Career Development Specialist at State University of New York at Oswego. I know you must be wondering why I would go from sunny California to snowy New York. Well the opportunity to specialize in the career development of students who want to pursue fine & performing arts, media, and entertainment industries was hard to pass up! My love for the arts and my experience of building a youth employment training program (OYE – Oakland Youth Engaged) with my former supervisor, Melecia Navarro, made my current position the ideal job! In a nutshell, this is what I do now.

As a new NY resident, I wondered how I would be able to gain more connections in the East Coast. My friend and coworker, Mallory Bower, showed me the application for the scholarship I applied for. She told me that it would be a great opportunity to attend EACE. She was definitely keeping it 100% with me.

I truly appreciate the sessions that challenged me to think of what I’m currently doing and how to be more intentional. I want to give another shout out to Justin Brown and his diversity workshop. It was one of the most engaging workshops that I’ve attended. In addition, I’d like to thank Nayelli Perez for her fear presentation and assessment resources. I’m hoping to utilize them this upcoming academic year.

I enjoyed the vendors who were present. Our office is currently looking at different options to help us increase our efficiency. Therefore being able to meet with the employees, test out the products, and ask questions was very helpful!

I was grateful to have many opportunities to be able to network with other colleagues in the field. I enjoyed going to the events and enjoying meals with others that allowed me to learn more about their position and how their universities function. One particular event that stood out to me was the Thursday Night Entertainment. It was my first time in Philadelphia, so I enjoydinoed being able to network outside of the conference center. Career Services folks definitely know how to have fun!

I’m glad that I had the opportunity to meet other colleagues from throughout the East Coast. I’m looking forward to continuing to build relationships with those I’ve met and build a network of people whom I can count on in our field. Thanks to everyone who put in all the time and energy to make this conference go well. My first time at the EACE Conference will definitely be memorable!

I would also like to thank SUNYCDO (State University of New York Career Development Organization) members who selfieattended the EACE conference. I appreciated all of you showing me around the city and introducing me to others throughout the conference. Cheers to building relationships with new colleagues!


Jennifer Roxas, Career Development Specialist. State University of New York at Oswego

Jenny Roxas earned a B.A. in Anthropology, with a Certificate in Applied Cultural Anthropology, and a minor in Italian from California State University, Chico. After graduating, she worked with probationers, foster youth, the gang-affiliated, and undocumented high school students, which led her to pursue an M.S. in student affairs and higher education at Indiana State University. Currently she is a Career Development Specialist at State University of New York (SUNY), Oswego. She is excited to build the foundation for forums to engage students, faculty, employers, and community partners within the arts, media, and entertainment industries. Jenny enjoys reflecting with students about their experiences and helping them see their untapped potential into their future dream career.


EACE Conference Takeaways by member Donna Brooks

The EACE Annual Conference, my take aways….

I have had the opportunity to be offered a new career position which is very inspiring.  I’m not content in a position unless I can learn and grow from that experience.  Having over 10 years of working in the field of Human Resources, I have transitioned into the field of Career Development at Norwalk Community College, Norwalk, CT.  I’ve seen many resumes in my day, produced job announcements and participated in many search committees.   So it appeared, this job is not going to be that difficult, it’s going to be somewhat easy..  WRONG!  I couldn’t be more mistaken!

I have found that it’s not easy to help create a resume and cover letter for a student who is in their first year of college and has never had a job before.   It is challenging to help a 1st year student in selecting a career path.  It’s difficult to encourage a student who after time and time again of submitting a resume, feels that the resume is ineffective. As a Career Coach I’ve experienced students whose momentum are low, feeling deeply discouraged and futures feel bleak.  I’m thinking to myself, what did I get myself into?  How will I learn to develop the expertise in this field so that I can both utilize my past experiences in HR and allow it to merge with my new position as a Career Coach.  It was apparent there were other things I needed to learn.

donnablogI participated in several workshops at the EACE conference which were informative and provided direction on best practices in the field. Attending the 2016 EACE Annual Conference was very stimulating.  My mind is still synthesizing with all that I absorbed in such a short period of time.  The EACE Conference was non-stop with workshop sessions, lectures, discussions, keynote speakers, activities and exhibits, which were very informative.  I got the chance to meet experienced and tenured people, with diverse backgrounds who came to learn and take on best practices just like me.

I am so thankful and grateful to be chosen to participate as the Diversity & Inclusion Ernie Andrews Scholarship Winner.  I truly do not believe I would have otherwise had this understanding had it not been for this scholarship and those who felt that I deserved it.   I can’t thank the committee enough as I was transformed, I am now inspired to push through my limits and take on the challenges that I face and network with others.  I also want to get involved as EACE has motivated me and has given me so much that I wish to give back therefore, I’ve signed up to participate Awards & Research Grants Committee.

donnablog2Moving forward, I’m hoping to develop relationships and networks in order to maximize what I have learned to service our student’s population and perhaps those in the profession.  Thank you again for helping me to transition and gain the knowledge and skills that I needed.

Donna Brooks

EACE – Ernie Andrews Scholarship Winner – 2016

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